Be Careful Who You Inspire!

  • Watching the student pack.

Wendy did you hit your head?!  “A six cylinder four wheel motorcycle, cross country with a stranger in one of the hottest August’s on record, are you crazy?”  This is what I kept hearing from my two wheel riding buddies when I told them of my next adventure.  Crazy yes, and crazier is that I did it!  A test in patience on many levels.

While on the mend from a recent racing accident I met with a reporter from a international Spanish speaking TV news station, Antonio Valverde.  He wanted to interview me.  I was a bit hesitant, for my Spanish sounds like that of a five year old, and I was still in a splint unable to ride yet.  We met for a pre-interview at my shop where I keep both classic and racing motorcycles as well as the home garage which has my modern street bikes.

IMG_4411 RVDRCI Multi

I ride many very different motorcycles and like them all.   Especially Ducati Multistradas.  I am height challenged at 5.5″, and the pre-2010 models have narrow seats which allow shorter people to touch ground.  This was important as they are my touring and camping bikes.  Two he asks?  I explain because I put on many miles and alternate them, a plus when an out of town friend is going to show up for a road trip.  Antonio and I are the same size, he asks to sit on one.  We agreed to check back in a couple a weeks.

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My splint is removed!  Doctor states activities are “as pain permits.”  He had no idea who he was talking to, a mid-distance ex-runner… what pain!?   I decide perfect physical therapy would be a nice long ride to put positive miles between me and my accident.  I was recovering not only from a displaced right arm break, but seven broken ribs, four broken lower vertebrae a compressed disk, a cracked illium and a collapsed lung.  I was not ready to race but I was definitely ready to ride, it had been almost three months.  The bike I wanted to ride was for sale in Brooklyn, NY, a vintage gentleman’s tourer.

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City slicker wants to ride.  I tell Antonio about my upcoming endeavor and little did I know that that cloud over his head had gotten bigger.  What I soon find out is that he wanted to get back on a motorcycle after a 30 year hiatus.  He had not ridden since selling his bike after being rear-ended by a car at an intersection in his home country, Argentina. He fantasized about going motorcycle camping as he had in the Patagonia.  I offered to let him ride my ’70’s Yamaha DT2 and ’04 Honda 250x dual sport bikes around town to get rid of the rust.   He does, a few times, complaining about having to kick start one and pushing the other seven blocks when it ran out of fuel.  I told him it’s all part of the training. conditioning and learning to troubleshoot.  Might have been easier also if he had not worn dress boots.   He’s lucky I didn’t make him fix the flat!

After talking to the seller, I find out the New York bike, a 1970 BMW R75/5 was not likely to make the trip without a complete going thru.  This was unfortunate news, and a deal breaker for me due to the costs.  I tell Antonio I am now available to complete our interview as I won’t be going to New York.  I am quickly told about his plan to acquire bike and asks if I will help.  It turns out he had been searching for a bike and found one in Jackson, Mississippi…a used Honda Goldwing with a Tow-Pac kit.  This is a 1500cc six cylinder motorcycle with two fairing wheeled out-riggers that act as stabilizers, so four wheels total!  The original rear wheel remains and still is the drive unit, unlike a trike, and almost as wide as a car.  It can tow a small trailer, this was not included…thank god!  I help negotiate the bike purchase, and save him a thousand dollars.  He is excited.

Curious, I ask him why such a big bike?  His reply; “Safety.  I want to be seen by traffic, I don’t care about going fast or splitting lanes.  I want to be able to go camping and produce stories on the road so I need to bring my camera equipment.  Will you help me get it home?”  I soon learn what he means by “get”… this means ride it home…in August!!!  I am reluctant.  He sweetens the deal, throws in a Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga closing tour concert in Washington D.C.,  as well as a stop in Nashville for more music before picking up the bike.  A paid vacation…so I think.  It will be fun so he thinks!  Only each of us will soon discover just how much work it will be, a test on many different levels.

Motoring West.

Motoring West.

I regularly cross country with my Sprinter van and race trailer. They are long miles even with air conditioning and a great sound system during the summer months.  I have also ridden a couple thousand miles on several bike trips in the States and in other countries.  On a motorcycle you are exposed to the elements and the worst is long interstate highways.  One mile feels like ten in triple digit heat and humidity or freezing cold. Especially when they are straight and no interesting stops, like U.S. Interstate 10 thru Texas.  Yet, I am glad I inspired him, but now also feel responsible for making sure he gets home in one piece.  Just not sure of his choice.  The Pro’s, it can’t tip over.  The Cons, I have no idea how it will handle and more importantly will it make it home? The Reasoning, it’s a Honda Goldwing, with 70K miles, what could possibly go wrong?  I nervously agree.

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Long distance motorcycle travel requires many skills sets.  It turns out I quickly learn my student, did not suffer from “riding rust” but “riding green”!   My first clue was when he showed up with four filled kitchen plastic bags along with a carry-on roller bag, and a two pound bottle of cologne.  I gave him a medium sized pack back and tell him to prioritize.  Your things must fit in this, hint…pack light and efficiently.  I show him mine, which included my laptop and camera, it is possible.  Second clue, he wants to camp part of the trip.

Watching the student pack.

Watching the student pack.

Has he really gone motorcycle camping before?  He appears to know idea of what is required for motorcycle camping.  So off to REI for the summer sleeping bag that compacts to football size and a baseball sized camping pillow.  I had the tent and stove, explaining we were motorcycle dry camping, imagine “gauchos”, Argentinian cowboys.  Our waterproof camping bag will go on the top case luggage rack and can not be too heavy for our horse.  It will have the tent, tarp, two sleeping bags, pillows, stove, towels and dishes.  His electronics and cameras will go in the top case for protection, 25lbs is the limit.  Which left one side case for each of us on the bike for our back packs holding clothes and toiletries.  I couldn’t believe he packed that cologne!

The two pound bottle of cologne!

The two pound bottle of cologne!

The beginning was fun, music concerts, interviews, easy peasy!  The real test starts when we pick up the bike on the fourth day of our trip in Jackson.  We head for New Orleans, he rides first leg.  After only 46 miles he pulls over, he is tired, we switch. This becomes a pattern.  I ride 120 miles, a full tank, he rides 40, only we need to average at least 300+ miles a day.  Antonio tells me when I finally ask, that he had only ever ridden a couple of thousand miles total on a motorcycle, and in a country where there is no traffic, you make your own road!  The triple digit heat and humidity is stifling him .  It quickly became apparent my student needed conditioning.  It is early August, and one of the hottest summers on record globally! I check weather along Interstate 10, 102F+, a change of route is in order.  We decide to head north to Interstate 40, it is 10 degrees cooler.  Only issue now will be the high plains thunderstorms.

Into the storm we go.

Into the storm we go.

Extreme weather conditions, heat, cold, wind and rain.  I noticed Antonio was very uncomfortable with the heat, making it more difficult to hold the needed concentration of sustaining highway speeds for long distances.  Luckily, years of racing in the Mojave desert in heat and cold, as well as winds is paid off for me.   He was not use to riding fast, and it didn’t help that the bike’s outrigger fairings vibrate viciously at higher speeds.  Outside of California most states interstate speeds are 75mph, and this includes trucks.  At these speeds the wind is deafening as well as fatiguing,  faces exposed, wearing intercom half helmets that came with the bike, too big and ten years old.  I also soon discover during the night riding legs he slows down until a car passes and when it is in front, he then suddenly speeds up.  I then realize he can’t see!  I become anxious and concerned, from now on I will ride night miles.  We are now in Lake Charles, Louisiana, it is only the second day of riding.  Next day we head north, and on our way to Austin we stop at a Houston Honda Dealer, for new full face flip up helmets that fit.  A welcome relief and well worth the investment.

We leave our mark.

We leave our mark.

Austin offered more great music, stories, and a chance to do laundry.  But it is still triple digit heat, we wait to leave at sunset.  A night in Ft. Worth and then on to Amarillo.   We stop at the famous Cadillac Ranch after I introduced him to an Americana road trip breakfast at a Waffle House.  We were entertained by the staff, who were still grilling even though the city was experiencing a major power outage.  In almost each city we are meeting interesting people and gathering stories, and everyone has one.  At the same time Antonio and I learning each others.  Including our short comings, I am reminded that mine is patience.

Your are Not the Boss of Me

I have been known to leave a journalist during a road trip.  Motorcycle distance travel is not for the faint of heart or the high maintenance.  It is important to be flexible and communicate, positively and effectively.  In this situation, safety was an issue due to the disparity in experience levels.  I really had to find patience and try to remember what it was like when I was first learning to ride, over 20 years ago.  And how much I didn’t know on my first long distance trip.  At times I had to raise my voice when it came to safety issues.  This didn’t help things between us.  I am also not the best passenger unless I have complete confidence in the rider.  I will attempt to ride the bike from back seat if necessary.  You couldn’t do that on this vehicle.  And when your student unplugs the intercom…purposely… you are at his mercy.   English is his second language, with a very “Latin” attitude and we are both head strong.   It was a good thing that I didn’t catch all his Spanish, for he speaks very fast.  There were some heated moments,  imagine  “I Love Lucy” meets “Married with Children”.

Had to refer to this often.

Had to refer to this often.

Crisis are good tests.  We had a few over the nine days on the bike and 3200 miles.  A GPS sending us in circles, getting caught in several lightening storms, a monsoon, a desert sand storm known as a “haboob”, daily humidity,  sweltering heat as high as 110F+,  125F+ asphalt road surfaces, a broken tail pipe, night time welding in the rain, a flat tire, and a dead battery were some memorable ones.  Then there was the lost gear, a jacket, glove, a map, charging cables and almost lost cellphones a couple of times.  Each time a lesson learned.  Mostly be organized, and the golden rule of touring, “Anything important on you or in the bike!”

Every stop, he keeps buying stuff!

Every stop, he keeps buying stuff!

We made it back, our load several pounds heavier. He was worse than a woman with his frequent souvenir purchases.  He started sneaking things on so I wouldn’t ask; “Where’s that going to go?”  We had to add two additional days of riding to account for the weather and repair delays.  Did I mention, we never once camped? It was either too hot, or too wet. But most importantly, we are still talking to each other.  This was something I wondered about before the trip began, traveling long distance is a test.  In fact,  prior to leaving on the trip I wrote that question on a notepad we left behind.   He found it on the return and responded with….”I would do it again.”  So I guess I wasn’t that bad of a teacher after all.   Very glad that I could inspire someone to go on adventure, pass on some knowledge, and learn to set aside my prejudices, regardless of how many wheels a vehicle may have.

 

– W. Newton, “Helmets n’ Heels”